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I tell you, folks. I am so tired of all this impeachment news, quid pro quos, emoluments, obstruction of justice, with an occasional ‘who’s zoomin’ who?’ thrown in for good measure it’s getting difficult to watch. It would be laughable if it weren’t so funny, so serious.

Illinois’ economic fortunes are turning around. After years of struggling to recover from the so-called Great Recession of 2008, the tide seems to be turning. Here are some of the headlines this year from the Illinois Department of Employment Security:

I am writing today to DEMAND the identity of the whistleblower who reported my Thanksgiving yard decorations to city officials, resulting in the impeachment of my character and the removal of my 20-foot-tall inflatable pilgrim and illuminated live turkey display.

Last week, as a member of the Board of Governors of the American College of Surgeons, I attended its annual congress in San Francisco. During the meeting about 2,000 surgeons were inducted as new fellows adding to the 85,000 fellows of the college. Surprisingly, 40% of the new fellows were f…

At a May 2016 campaign rally in Charleston, West Virginia, Donald Trump, the presumed GOP nominee for president, told the faithful: “If I win, we’re going to bring those miners back. You’re going to be so proud of your president. For those miners, get ready, because you’re going to be working your asses off.”

If you live in non-metro or rural America, you’ve been left behind by the economic boom cycle that came after the Great Recession. You also endured a more severe recession than people who live in bigger cities.

Yogi Berra once famously gave this puzzling advice to a college graduating class, “When you come to a fork in the road, take it.” The quip became lore, along with other Yogi-isms attributed to the legendary baseball player.

Current “must win at all costs” campaigning — where big money and trashing one’s opponent in a close race seem de rigueur — may be at the heart of what ails American politics. There are other reasons, and good ones, to run, even if the candidate doesn’t expect to win.

Political corruption in Illinois is back in the news. (When did it leave?) A reader writes: Why so much corruption, and so little in neighboring states?

There are political moments, and this might be one, in which worse is better. Moments, that is, when a society’s per capita quantity of conspicuous stupidity is so high and public manners are so low that a critical mass of people are jolted into saying “enough, already.” Looking on the brigh…

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This is roseworthy news that the Associated Pess reported on Friday: “An Illinois task force that examined the safety of pharmacy practices in the state is recommending that pharmacists take breaks and take more time when dispensing medications. State officials created the task force after …

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The intent of this column is to leave you with information that may enhance your perspective of the Father position. I know this is a unique article to present, but it is a very powerful ingredient in the strengthening of the community.

I muse widely, yet my knowledge base in quite narrow. So, I could sure use help from thoughtful readers who know more than I about the topics below, which I am beginning to explore for possible essays. If you have informed thoughts and links to good sources, please email at jnowlan3@gmail.com.

“I am a classically trained engineer,” says Rep. Will Hurd, a Texas Republican, “and I firmly believe in regression to the mean.” Applying a concept from statistics to the randomness of today’s politics is problematic. In any case, Hurd, 42, is not waiting for the regression of our politics …

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Anyone who has waited and waited at the Effingham Amtrak station for a train can believe this thornworthy report by the Chicago Tribune: “Amtrak’s Illini and Saluki trains, which provide transportation for thousands of college students, have among the worst on-time performance records in th…

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Am I the only one who does not get it? I keep scratching my bald head trying to understand the bizarre way that we have been conducting our foreign policy in the Middle East. I am writing this column from Cairo, Egypt. As I read the European, American and Middle East newspapers, I can see th…

I recently took a business trip to San Francisco, known as “The City by the Bay” and “The City Where Millionaires are Considered Middle Class.” It’s the only city where, instead of exercising, I shed unsightly pounds simply by not eating.

WASHINGTON – The judge took 130 pages to explain that Harvard’s “holistic review” admissions policies – which include ascribing particular attributes to certain ethnicities, such as Asian Americans, and assessing the value to Harvard of those attributes – are, considering 41 years of Supreme…

Once upon a time, having a job at a newspaper meant working in one of the most imposing buildings in town, inhaling the acrid aroma of fresh ink and the dusty breath of cheap newsprint and feeling mini-earthquakes under our feet every time the presses started to roll. For those of us old eno…

For centuries, citizens have turned to their local news publication for local breaking and investigative news, as well as to learn about hot-button issues in their communities. In the last 15 years, with the rise of digital communications, many readers have changed their preferences to digit…

With Bernie Sanders’ heart attack, perhaps precipitated by the stress of campaigning with unabated revolutionary fervor, coupled with head-snapping contradictory pronouncements from spinmeister Rudy Giuliani, some found themselves wondering if millennial ageism is warranted.

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The Associated Press reported this roseworthy news on Friday: “The U.S. unemployment rate fell to 3.5% in September, the lowest level in nearly five decades, even though employers appeared to turn more cautious and slowed their hiring. The economy added a modest 136,000 jobs, enough to like…

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Roses to the City of Effingham for giving water customers a 10-day grace period after water bills somehow got lost in the mail. According to the City of Effingham Facebook page, payment of bills will be extended to Oct. 25. Typically, water bills are due on the 15th of each month. “Although …

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This column is dedicated to the endangered position of the father and a commitment to revive this position in the eyes of the family. When the necessary respect for the father is restored to family, then and only then will the societal ills no more run rampant as they have been allowed.

SEOUL, South Korea – In 1950, when Han Sung-joo was 10, shrapnel from an artillery shell lodged in his hip. This happened as Gen. Douglas MacArthur’s troops, fresh from the bold Incheon landing, were retaking this city – it would be lost and retaken again – after North Korea’s June invasion.…

You know you should have a will, but you keep stalling. No one likes to think about dying or about someone else raising their children. But if you get no further than scribbling notes or thinking about which lawyer to hire, you risk dying “intestate” — without a will that could guide your lo…

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