Effingham Daily News, Effingham, IL

Features

October 11, 2013

Ouch! 10 athletes with bizarre injuries that had nothing to do with their sport

Getting hurt on the field is one thing. But pro athletes are just as prone to injuring themselves in unusual ways as the rest of us. Need proof? Here are 10 freakish instances where mind lost out to matter.

Clint Barmes

In 2005 Barmes, then a rookie shortstop with the Colorado Rockies, was sidelined for three months with a broken collarbone after he fell down a flight of stairs while carrying a package of deer meat given to him by teammate Todd Helton. Doctors inserted a titanium plate and nine screws to help the bone heal.

Adam Eaton

In his first full season with the San Diego Padres in 2001, Eaton suffered a bizarre injury when he accidentally stabbed himself in the stomach while trying to open a package of DVDs with a paring knife.

Chris Hanson

In 2003, Jaguars coach Jack Del Rio placed some wood and an ax in the team's locker room to inspire his players to "keep chopping wood" after an 0-3 start to the season. Hanson, taking Del Rio's message far too literally, gashed his right leg with the ax while trying to chop the wood, thus ending his season.

Gus Frerotte

In 1997, after scoring on a one-yard run late in the first half of a game against the New York Giants, the Redskins quarterback celebrated by head-butting a padded wall near the end zone. Frerotte suffered a sprained neck and was taken to a nearby hospital. Remarkably, he was able to play the following week.

Jeff Kent

An incident during spring training in 2002 left the Giants' star second baseman with a broken wrist. Kent initially claimed that he sustained the injury while washing his truck; however, subsequent media reports indicated that Kent hurt himself when he crashed his motorcycle while doing stunts on it -- in direct violation of his contract.

Brian Anderson

In 1998, while pitching for the Arizona Diamondbacks, Anderson decided to test the temperature of an iron…by pressing it against his jaw. Yes, it was hot.

Bill Gramatica

While kicking for the Arizona Cardinals in 2001, Gramatica tore the ACL in his right leg while celebrating a 43-yard field goal. In the first quarter. Of a regular season game. He missed the rest of the season.

Lionel Simmons

During his rookie season with the Sacramento Kings in 1990-91, Simmons missed two games with tendinitis in his wrist, brought on by too much time spent playing his Nintendo Game Boy.

Tom Glavine

After a particularly disagreeable meal on a team flight in 1992, Glavine threw up so violently that he cracked two ribs and landed on the disabled list.

John Vanbiesbrouck

Following the 1988 season, Vanbiesbrouck -- an All-Star goaltender with the New York Rangers -- lacerated his ulnar nerve and three tendons when the glass table he was sitting on collapsed. He needed five hours of surgery to remove glass shards from his wrist and repair the damage. He recovered in time for the team's training camp three months later.

Sources: Wikipedia and media reports

Text Only
Features
  • Study: Kids gain weight more quickly over summer break

    Any parent or teacher can tell you that schoolchildren tend to slip back a bit academically over the long summer break. But now a Harvard University study has come up with troubling indications that they also gain weight more quickly during those months when, traditionally, we hope they're outdoors much of the time, enjoying the summer sun.

    June 16, 2014

  • 20140614-AMX-RETIRE-GENX14.jpg Lean retirement looms for Generation X

    When their working years end, Gen-Xers might have to live on just half of their pre-retirement income, compared with 60 percent for the Baby Boom generation, Pew said last year.

    June 16, 2014 1 Photo

  • 20140612-AMX-FATHERS-CARDS123.jpg Father's Day cards make subjects the targets of jokes

    There's a good chance if you receive — or give — a Father's Day card this weekend, Dad will be portrayed as a flatulent, beer-obsessed, tool-challenged buffoon who would rather hog the remote, go fishing or play golf than be with the kids.

    June 15, 2014 3 Photos

  • Texting while driving is latest teen risk as smoking declines

    While smoking among American teens has fallen to a 22-year low, most adolescents admit to engaging in a new type of risky behavior: texting while driving.

    June 15, 2014

  • $15 minimum wage puts Seattle in uncharted waters

    Depending on which pundit is nattering away, this means Seattle is either going to fall off the map and become a "Mad Max"-style economic wasteland or transform into an egalitarian utopia that inspires sweeping pro-labor activism nationwide.

    June 7, 2014

  • 2010-Winter-Olympic-Games-001.jpg Nobody wants to host the Winter Olympics

    If we end up watching slopestyle from the Central Asia steppes in 2022, it will likely be because it's becoming clear that nobody in Europe wants to host these Olympics anymore. Publics may finally be getting wise to the fact that the long-term economic benefits of hosting mega-events like the Olympics or the World Cup are usually negligible at best.

    May 27, 2014 1 Photo

  • airplanes-work-1.jpg Airfare honesty? It may be an oxymoron

    The issue of fare advertising has taken on a renewed sense of urgency now that Congress is considering removing the Transportation Department's full-fare advertising rule, which requires airlines and ticket sellers to display a price that you can actually book.

    May 27, 2014 1 Photo

  • Study: Both men and women feel less stress at work than at home

    In a newly released study in the Journal of Science and Medicine, researchers carefully examined the levels of the stress hormone, cortisol, of a variety of workers throughout the day. The data clearly showed that both men and women are significantly less stressed out at work than they are at home.
     And the women they studied said they were happier at work. While the men said they felt happier at home.

    May 27, 2014

  • Five myths about caffeine

    But how much do you know about the drug - and yes, it is a drug - you're consuming? Before downing one more gulp of your favorite stimulant, let go of some persistent, caffeinated myths.

    May 27, 2014

  • Making the most of longer school days

    Research shows that extra time doesn't help unless it is well used. With that in mind, the Boston-based National Center on Time and Learning has just released recommendations on the best way to construct a longer school day.

    May 26, 2014

AP Video
Parade
Magazine

Click HERE to read all your Parade favorites including Hollywood Wire, Celebrity interviews and photo galleries, Food recipes and cooking tips, Games and lots more.